Tag Archives: 7. Swimming World

Tips and Tricks

Weekly Round-up

from Scientific Swimming Article Review by noreply@blogger.com (G. John Mullen)

1. The important of vitamin D, read here.

2. Want to raise your testosterone?  Watch some sports, read here.

3. Is Michael Phelps having an off year, the swimming geek (name up for grabs this weekend) believes so, read here.

4. Rest intervals, how important are they in hypertrophy training?  Also, how is hypertrophy measured?  Read here

5. Where are my triathletes with back pain?  This article discusses how peripheral sources can cause back pain. It focuses on the foot, specifically the subtalar joint.  This can be one cause of low back pain, but it isn’t so simple.  In fact the hip can control the ankle which can be causing back pain…I know it is a convulated puzzle!  Anyway, quick here for the read.

6. A fellow physical therapy enthusiast Tom Hermann discusses the importance of power training in swimming.  I have been breaching this for a while and find every swimmer can benefit from this form of resistance training.  The only area I disagree with Tom is with back squats.  Swimmers stress their shoulder a lot and I the position to hold the bar during back squat is advantageous for injury.  Instead I have athletes perform front squats for quad activation in combination with a hip extensor strengthening exercise, read here.

7. Well Shawn Cater aka Jay-z was the first rapper with a shoe and now Ryan Lochte is the first swimmer with a shoe…love it!  Eric thanks for breaking the story first, click here.

8.  What athlete does not have superstition?  I remember pressing my goggles into my eye sockets repeatedly before a race and having specific pre meet meals in college.  I know other swimmers who perform a specific amount of arm swings or have a “special” suit.  Do these superstitions help?  A recent study reports they actually make a difference, read more here.  What is the weirdest pre meet ritual you’ve seen?  Don’t worry if you submit something I won’t assume it’s about you…

9.  Are push-ups good for swimmers?  Hells yes!  Similar to baseball pitchers discussed in this article, swimmers have weak serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscles, in fact swimmers with shoulder pain how lower activation of these muscles, which I discussed here.  Watch below for proper push-up progression, turn the speakers up!

Popout
Thera-bands can be purchased here. Thera-Band Single Pack Latex Exercise Bands – 5′ x 5.5″ – Green

10. Leg extension machine has to be safe, I mean everyone does it, right?  Wrong, bad kitty!  This exercise puts high stress on the patellofemoral joint and can lead to injury, read here.

11. Want to sleep easier, don’t eat these foods

12. Sports nutrition is something I feel swimmers are lacking, click here to see a video of the top 5 supplements athletes should ingest, I don’t advocate every supplement, but the risk/benefit should be considered.

13. How often do you sit?  At internships I only sit 4 hours a day compared to school days where I sit up to 12 hours a day!  Here is a good article discussing the risks of prolonged sitting.  I am in talks with USMS about the effects of sitting on swimming, stay tuned.

14. Here is another post which questions the horrific claims of lactic acid.  I discussed it briefly in the baking soda conversation, read here. Once again, great anaerobic athletes typically can produce high lactate, so can it be that horrendous? Wanna try, ARM & HAMMER Baking Soda – 12 lb. bag?

15. Oblique and abdominal strength is essential in swimming and the crunch is overused.  People are sitting way too much (refer to #13) and a crunch mimics the poor posture sustained throughout the day.  Here is another “atypical” abdominal exercise which would be easy to implement.

16. Gold Medal Mel posted a great interview with Nathan Adrian…47 in practice, damn! Click here.

ADVICE ON DROWNING PREVENTION

 

Below are releases on studies appearing in the June issue of Pediatrics, the peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

For Release: Monday, May 24, 2010 12:01 am (ET)

AAP GIVES UPDATED ADVICE ON DROWNING PREVENTION

 Before families head to the beach or pool this Memorial Day, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated guidance on water safety and drowning prevention. In its updated policy, the AAP has revised its guidance on swimming lessons and highlights new drowning risks – including large, inexpensive, portable and inflatable pools – that have emerged in the past few years.

Fortunately, drowning rates have fallen steadily from 2.68 per 100,000 in 1985 to 1.32 per 100,000 in 2006. But drowning continues to be the second leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 19, claiming the lives of roughly 1,100 children in 2006. Toddlers and teenaged boys are at greatest risk.

“To protect their children, parents need to think about layers of protection,” said Jeffrey Weiss, MD, FAAP, lead author of the policy statement and technical report, which will be published in the July print issue of Pediatrics and released early online May 24.

“Children need to learn to swim,” Dr. Weiss said. “But even advanced swimming skills cannot ‘drown-proof’ a child of any age. Parents must also closely supervise their children around water and know how to perform CPR. A four-sided fence around the pool is essential.”

A fence that completely surrounds the pool – isolating it from the house – can cut drowning risk in half. Unfortunately, laws regarding pool fencing may have dangerous loopholes. Large, inflatable above-ground pools can contain thousands of gallons of water and may even require filtration equipment, so they are left filled for weeks at a time. But because they are considered “portable,” these pools often are exempt from local building codes requiring pool fencing. From 2004 to 2006, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported 47 deaths of children related to inflatable pools. “Because some of these pools have soft sides, it is very easy for a child to lean over and fall headfirst into the water,” Dr. Weiss said. “These pools pose a constant danger.”

In the new policy, the AAP reinforces its existing recommendation that most children age 4 and older should learn to swim, but the AAP is now more open toward classes for younger children. In the past, the AAP advised against swimming lessons for children ages 1 to 3 because there was little evidence that lessons prevented drowning or resulted in better swim skills, and there was a concern parents would become less vigilant about supervising a child who had learned some swimming skills.

But new evidence shows that children ages 1 to 4 may be less likely to drown if they have had formal swimming instruction. The studies are small, and they don’t define what type of lessons work best, so the AAP is not recommending mandatory swim lessons for all children ages 1 to 4 at this time. Instead, the new guidance recommends that parents should decide whether to enroll an individual child in swim lessons based on the child’s frequency of exposure to water, emotional development, physical abilities, and certain health concerns related to pool water infections and pool chemicals.

“Not every child will be ready to learn to swim at the same age,” Dr. Weiss said. “Swimming lessons can be an important part of the overall protection, which should include pool barriers and constant, capable supervision.”

The AAP does not recommend formal water safety programs for children younger than 1 year of age. The water-survival skills programs for infants may make compelling videos for the Internet, but no scientific study has yet demonstrated these classes are effective, the policy states.

 The updated policy also outlines the danger of body entrapment and hair entanglement in a pool or spa drain. Special drain covers and other devices that release the pressure in a drain can prevent such incidents.

AAP offers specific advice for parents:

  1. Never – even for a moment – leave small children alone or in the care of another young child while in bathtubs, pools, spas or wading pools, or near irrigation ditches or standing water. Bath seats cannot substitute for adult supervision. Empty water from buckets and other containers immediately after use. To prevent drowning in toilets, young children should not be left alone in the bathroom.
  2. Closely supervise children in and around water. With infants, toddlers and weak swimmers, an adult should be within an arm’s length. With older children and better swimmers, an adult should be focused on the child and not distracted by other activities.
  3. If children are in out-of-home child care, ask about exposure to water and the ratio of adults to children.
  4. If you have a pool, install a four-sided fence that is at least 4 feet high to limit access to the pool. The fence should be hard to climb (not chain-link) and have a self-latching, self-closing gate. Families may consider pool alarms and rigid pool covers as additional layers of protection, but neither can take the place of a fence.
  5. Children need to learn to swim.  AAP supports swimming lessons for most children 4 years and older. Classes may reduce the risk of drowning in younger children as well, but because children develop at different rates, not all children will be ready to swim at the same age.
  6. Parents, caregivers and pool owners should learn CPR.
  7. Do not use air-filled swimming aids (such as inflatable arm bands) in place of life jackets. They can deflate and are not designed to keep swimmers safe.
  8. All children should wear a life jacket when riding in a boat. Small children and nonswimmers should also wear one at water’s edge, such as on a river bank or pier.
  9. Parents should know the depth of the water and any underwater hazards before allowing children to jump in.  The first time you enter the water, jump feet first; don’t dive.
  10. When choosing an open body of water for children to swim in, select a site with lifeguards.  Swimmers should know what to do in case of rip currents (swim parallel to the shore until out of the current, then swim back to the shore).
  11. Counsel teenagers about the increased risk of drowning when alcohol is involved.

Link to article – 

News Highlights – May 17, 2010.